Visiting McKnight Resident Artist: Eva Kwong

Northern Clay Center welcomes McKnight Resident Artist Eva Kwong, who will join us from January 15 through March 31, 2017. Kwong is one of two artists invited to participate in the McKnight Residency program in 2017. The other, Forrest Lesch-Middelton, joins us beginning April 1. 

Since 1990 Kwong has taught at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio. Born in Hong Kong, she received a BFA in ceramics and sculpture from Rhode Island School of Design, and an MFA in drawing and ceramics from Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia. Kwong’s ceramic pieces are in collections around the world, including the Mint Museum of Craft + Design, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Finnish Craft Museum, and FuLe International Ceramics Art Museum. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally. Kwong has lectured extensively, and is the recipient of multiple Ohio Art Council Fellowships and one National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.

Kwong is known for her voluminous, colorful, large- and small-scale ceramic sculptures, vessels, and installations, inspired by her longtime interest in the organic forms and colors observed in nature. As Kwong continues to be captivated by and to translate observed interconnections, she paints an arc of her studio practice. She explains that in her artwork, “the microscopic is juxtaposed with the cosmic, the imagined with the real, the observed with the conceptualized, and the personal with the universal.”

Kwong will present a free lecture about her work on Tuesday, January 31, at 6:30 pm in NCC’s Library. 

This program is sponsored by the McKnight Foundation and reflects the Foundation’s interest in supporting outstanding individual ceramic artists who have proven their abilities, and are at a career stage that is beyond emerging. 

 
Claudia Alvarez: Autumn 2014

Claudia Alvarez (New York, NY), was born in Mexico and raised in California, Alvarez holds an MFA from the California College of the Arts, San Francisco, and a BA from the University of California–Davis. Her figurative work has been featured in such publications as American CraftCeramics: Art and Perception, and NY Arts Magazine. Alvarez’s recent exhibitions include ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out, Ohio Craft Museum, Columbus; Its Surreal Thing: The Temptation of Objects, Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, NE; Girls with Guns, Scott White Contemporary Art, La Jolla, CA; and The Figure, Keramik Museum, Westerwald, Höhr-Grenzhausen, Germany.

Between 1987 and 2000, Alvarez worked in Sacramento at the UC Davis Medical Center as a non-emergency ambulance driver. Her experience with terminally ill children and elderly patients during that time has greatly shaped her ceramic work.  Her ceramic sculptures address the ways in which social, political, and psychological structures impact behavior and personal interactions. Often depicting children who have adult characteristics and mannerisms, her sculptures address issues relating to violence, empowerment, and endurance. 

This program is sponsored by the McKnight Foundation and reflects the Foundation’s interest in supporting outstanding individual ceramic artists who have already proven their abilities, and are at a career stage that is beyond emerging.

Tom Bartel: Summer 2014

Tom Bartel (Athens, OH) joined us in the summer of 2014 as a short-term, invited McKnight Resident Artist. We had a great time with him, and also enjoyed meeting his wife, Rachael. During his residency, Bartel also acted as the ceramics juror for the Uptown Art Fair. 

Bartel holds an MFA from Indiana University in Bloomington and a BFA from Kent State University in Ohio.  He is currently an Associate Professor at Ohio University in Athens, where he maintains a studio.  Bartel has lectured extensively and has been an invited faculty and artist-in-residence at such sites at Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green; Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, TN; Red Lodge Clay Center in Montana; and Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, Newcastle, ME.  His figurative sculpture has been included in exhibitions at The Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, MA; Southern Ohio Museum in Portsmouth, OH; Santa Fe Clay in New Mexico; and The International Ceramics Studio, Kecskemét, Hungary.

Jae Won Lee: Winter 2015

Northern Clay Center welcomed 2014 McKnight Residency recipient Jae Won Lee, from January through March, 2015. Lee currently lives and works in Michigan, where she is Professor of Art at Michigan State University in Lansing. 

Lee’s recent exhibitions include the NCECA invitationals in 2010 (Flow) and in 2014 (Earth Matters), Select at Paul Kotula Projects, Small Favors at The Clay Studio in Philadelphia, The Sum of Its Parts at Santa Fe Clay, and exhibitions in both Switzerland and Korea. She has recently completed residencies at the Clayarch Gimhae Museum, Korea; Beijing University, China; and the Pottery Workshop in Jingdezhen, China. She lectures and gives workshops around the country, and her work is featured in numerous publications, including Studio Potter.

Her current body of work, In Search of Streams and Mountains, builds upon Lee’s research and travels through Korea and China, exploring the “macro view” of nature in traditional arts of painting, poetry, and calligraphy. She writes, “this new journey explores the divisions and unifications of nature, culture, and society as well as the acculturation of eastern ideas in a western environment.”

Amy Santoferraro: Spring 2015

From April to June, we welcomed Amy Santoferraro, our 2015 Spring McKnight Resident Artist. Santoferraro currently lives and works in Manhattan, Kansas, where she is assistant professor of art and ceramics area coordinator at Kansas State University.

Building upon her childhood obsession with collecting silica packets found in shoes, Santoferraro continues to be interested in the human drive to collect objects, to organize and make sense of our surroundings through the material world. By assembling and tinkering with carefully handpicked thrift store objects, she creates personal narratives that beg the objects to engage in their own artificiality and hidden sentiment.

Santoferraro’s work has been shown throughout the United States, as well as in solo exhibitions in Rome, Italy, and Cwmbram, Wales, UK. Recent exhibitions include Clay on the Wall, curated by Glen Brown; Affably Amusing, at the Belger Crane Yard Studios; Arrowmont Surface Symposium Show; and the Small Favors shows (2007 – 2012) at The Clay Studio, Philadelphia. She earned her BFA and BAE at The Ohio State University before completing her MFA at New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. She also completed a post-baccalaureate year at Louisiana State University. In addition to her studio work, Santoferraro has worked as an outreach, elementary, and secondary school instructor, and performed as a juror and curator for multiple exhibitions.

Andy Shaw: Summer 2015

Summer 2015 brought the arrival of Andy Shaw as the McKnight Resident, beginning July 1. Shaw earned an MFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University and a BA in History from Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. He worked as an apprentice at Basin Creek Pottery, Montana. Shaw has completed residencies at the Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts in Helena, Montana; Arrowmont School of Crafts in Gatlinburg, Tennessee; and The Clay Studio in Philadelphia.

His tableware has received multiple awards, is shown widely across the US, and has been published in Studio Potter, Ceramics Monthly, Ceramics: Art and Perception, and Garth Clark’s book, Shards. Shaw’s work is included in numerous museum collections around the world and he has presented workshops across the United States, including at NCC’s American Pottery Festival. Shaw is currently an associate professor at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, where he was named Outstanding Teacher of the Year in 2012 and 2014.

When discussing his work, Shaw states, “Pottery makes physical and poignant contact between impressions of my life and those of the person using the pot through intimations in color, form, and tactile sensation. Utilizing systematic patterns on a flexible surface, my work suggests freedom to bend within a predominant structure. When I use pots in my home, whether they are my own or the work of another potter, within the time over breakfast and with gentle insistence, the pots encourage me toward imagining a life.”

This program is sponsored by the McKnight Foundation and reflects the Foundation’s interest in supporting outstanding individual ceramic artists who have already proven their abilities, and are at a career stage that is beyond emerging.

Jessica Brandl: Autumn 2015

 Jessica Brandl brought her attention to craft and detail to NCC’s studio for the fall season, October – December, 2015. Her illustrated and sculptural pottery joins “images and objects of detritus of the past with the places of the present” with pointed narrative implications directed at “contemporary issues of expansion, homogenization, ecological deterioration, and consumption.”

Her proposal for the McKnight Residency at NCC is to tap into the distinctive character of this region of the US as she builds dinner table tableaux, offering the viewer a “latticework through which they can contribute to the meaning and personal interpretation of the narrative I allude to.” She will also be investing in still and video cameras to further describe her process, as a 21st-century maker, through time-lapse photography and short documentaries.

Brandl has recently been a resident at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center, the Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts, the Armory Art Center, and the Ceramics Program at Harvard. Her work has been featured in galleries from the Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston, to Red Star Studios, and the Smithsonian Craft Show, including a solo show at The Clay Studio, Philadelphia. She earned her BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute, and her MFA from The Ohio State University in 2009.

This program is sponsored by the McKnight Foundation and reflects the Foundation’s interest in supporting outstanding individual ceramic artists who have proven their abilities, and are at a career stage that is beyond emerging.

Kathryn Finnerty: Winter 2016

Northern Clay Center welcomed McKnight Residency recipient Kathryn Finnerty from January through March, 2016. Finnerty was invited to the McKnight Residency program through a nominative process involving past resident artists and other leaders in the field of ceramics. Since 2000, she has owned Pleasant Hill Pottery in Eugene, Oregon, where she also teaches at Lane Community College.

Finnerty has recently had one-person exhibitions at Schaller Gallery and Red Lodge Clay Center. She has contributed to many other exhibitions, including at Santa Fe Clay, LUX Center for the Arts, James Renwick Alliance of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the American Pottery Festival at NCC. Her work is carried by AKAR Gallery, Pewabic Gallery, and The Clay Studio Philadelphia, and several others. Her exquisitely decorated surfaces have been featured in Making Marks: Discovering the Ceramic Surface (Robin Hopper, 2004) and others, including 500 Teapots (vol. 1, 2002, and vol. 2, 2013) and 500 Pitchers (2005).

Her work has drawn inspiration from 19th century English pottery, particularly Victorian majolica, with classically inspired designs, raised-line relief, and sprig and sgraffito images. Her current body of work is evolving through an “abstracted landscape narrative,” and involves larger, slab-constructed vessels; her use of bright, harmonious colors is evident throughout.

Lung-Chieh Lin: Spring 2016

NCC’s Spring McKnight Resident Artist joins us from Taiwan. Lung-Chieh Lin earned his MFA in 2011 from Tainan National University of the Arts and has since worked in Spain, Denmark, Oman, and Poland. His work has been included in group exhibitions in Taiwan, as well as in Spain, Korea, Japan, China, Hungary, and Austria, and in a one-person show in South Carolina.

During his residency, Lin will create forms that take cues and derive “species” from the environment, such as buildings, human behavior, light, and time. He writes, “I have extracted images of the artificial objects that I have formed emotional connections with (outlets on a computer, the speakers of a sound system, the vents on an air conditioner) and mixed them with organic beings, such as the insects, plants, and micro-organisms found in the space I exist in. The results are a medley of creature-like forms, with the objective of representing the perceptual experience that the body has with the micro-matters in its dwelling place.”

Joseph Pintz: Summer 2016

Joseph Pintz’s minimal forms reference traditional pottery and implements associated with the hand. He describes his forms as both “minimal” and “mundane,” but within their stoic forms are layers of depth—from the rough earthenware clay to fragmented slips and an ever-evolving palette of monochrome translucent glazes. He writes, “On a formal level, they deal with issues of mass, line, and volume; while on a utilitarian level, they serve food—an act that requires physical participation. The rituals of eating and serving actively slow the viewer, allowing you to pay closer attention to the meal, the moment, and the company around the table.”

Taking time away from his teaching position at the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, Pintz will focus on this line of functional objects as our summer McKnight Resident. He has previously taught at Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH and given workshops at Utah State University, Logan, UT; Anderson Ranch Art Center, Snowmass Village, CO; and Greenwich House Pottery, New York, NY.

Pintz recently completed a residency at the Roswell Artist-in-Residence program in New Mexico, and was among the artists featured in NCC’s collaborative exhibition Exquisite Pots II: Red-Handed (2013). His work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the University of Nebraska–Omaha; Schaller Gallery, St. Joseph, MI; Lillstreet Art Center, Chicago, IL; and Crimson Laurel Gallery, Bakersville, NC among others. He has had numerous two-person and group shows, including above ground / under water at Turman Larison Contemporary in Helena, Montana; ABC of Dinnerware at Santa Fe Clay; and Object Focus: The Bowl at Portland’s Museum of Contemporary Craft in Oregon. 

Pintz completed his MFA at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, and earned his BA from Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. He will be in residence at NCC in June and July, 2016.

Eva Kwong: Winter 2017

Northern Clay Center welcomes McKnight Resident Artist Eva Kwong, who will join us from January 15 through March 31, 2017. Kwong is one of two artists invited to participate in the McKnight Residency program in 2017. The other, Forrest Lesch-Middelton, joins us beginning April 1. 

Since 1990 Kwong has taught at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio. Born in Hong Kong, she received a BFA in ceramics and sculpture from Rhode Island School of Design, and an MFA in drawing and ceramics from Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia. Kwong’s ceramic pieces are in collections around the world, including the Mint Museum of Craft + Design, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Finnish Craft Museum, and FuLe International Ceramics Art Museum. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally. Kwong has lectured extensively, and is the recipient of multiple Ohio Art Council Fellowships and one National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.

Kwong is known for her voluminous, colorful, large- and small-scale ceramic sculptures, vessels, and installations, inspired by her longtime interest in the organic forms and colors observed in nature. As Kwong continues to be captivated by and to translate observed interconnections, she paints an arc of her studio practice. She explains that in her artwork, “the microscopic is juxtaposed with the cosmic, the imagined with the real, the observed with the conceptualized, and the personal with the universal.”

Kwong will present a free lecture about her work on Tuesday, January 31, at 6:30 pm in NCC’s Library. 

This program is sponsored by the McKnight Foundation and reflects the Foundation’s interest in supporting outstanding individual ceramic artists who have proven their abilities, and are at a career stage that is beyond emerging. 

 

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